I dip woven, wrapped and coiled baling wire forms in casting slip. Then I fire these forms in a raku kiln.

The genesis of my present work comes from a wire egg basket that a friend gave me 17 years ago in a painting workshop. I began looking more closely at objects made of wire and found beautiful shapes in wire fish traps, animal muzzles and vintage kitchen utensils. I also looked at the work of other artists using wire. The drawings and installations of the Venezuelan artist Gego, the crocheted wire sculpture of Ruth Asawa, Alexander Calder’s whimsical wire portraits and Richard Tuttle’s minimal wire line drawings have been an inspiration to me. At first I made baling wire grids and basketry forms. Over time the pieces became looser and more like 3d drawings. The latest evolution is cladding these wire constructions in casting slip.

Clay is a new passion for me. In the past I have worked in many different media including painting, collage, assemblage, and drawing. A love of the materials that I use and my curiosity about unpredictable processes has always driven my artwork.

Firing clay-covered wire can have unforeseeable outcomes. Because baling wire is not heat resistant I never know if the wire/clay pieces will survive the firings intact. Sometimes the pieces come out of the kiln whole just as I made them. But sometimes there is slumping, cracking and chipping. My interest is in both the control and lack of control that is inherent in this process.